Disneyland in the 60’s

By Keith Mahne

Much like retro Disney World videos, I’m a sucker for vintage Disneyland ones as well. I take joy in watching visitors dressed in their Sunday best and love noticing how different things have changed over the years. There is nothing quite like basking in the magic of vintage Disneyland. Seeing the park during a time when attractions like the Skyway, PeopleMover, and Mine Train Through Nature’s Wonderland continuing to mystify guests and realizing that everything present was touched by Walt is what I enjoy the most. Today, let’s travel back to Disneyland of the 1960’s and revel in the magic together…

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Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

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Making of: Disneyland’s Light Magic Parade

By Keith Mahne

Light Magic was a parade that ran at Disneyland from May – September of 1997. Originally billed as a replacement for the distinguished and beloved Main Street Electrical Parade, Light Magic opened to poor reviews and closed only four short months later. Though Disney officially stated at the time that the show would return in the year 2000, it never again saw the “light” of day. Despite the show’s short run, infrastructure improvements made specifically for Light Magic, mainly in Fantasyland, are still used today. Let’s see how the parade was constructed and find out why it never lived up to expectations in today’s brand new Making of article…

Light Magic was a “streetacular”, with floats moving into two performance zones, one located at the Small World Mall, the other on Main Street. Upon reaching the performance zones, the floats would stop and the pixie characters, who were the focus of the show, would awaken to perform step-dancing routines for the audience, later being joined by Disney characters and audience members.

During the performance segment, a portion of each of the floats would open to reveal a screen upon which images were projected from equipment hidden in the surrounding buildings. As part of the grand finale, the fairies would use their ‘magic’ to throw pixie dust, confetti falls from the sky, and the buildings light up with a shower of twinkling lights provided by fiber optics embedded in the structures.

 

 

 
 
 
 
Light Magic’s music was very Celtic-influenced, and the songs in the show included:
  • “Dream Our Dream”, the Light Magic Theme
  • “Little April Shower” from Bambi
  • “Be Our Guest” from Beauty and the Beast
  • “Topsy Turvy” from The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • “Step in Time” from Mary Poppins
  • “When You Wish upon a Star” from Pinocchio
  • “A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes” from Cinderella
  • “Part of Your World” from The Little Mermaid
  • “Beauty and the Beast” from Beauty and the Beast
  • “Baroque Hoedown” from the Main Street Electrical Parade


Light Magic had a difficult role to fill as The Main Street Electrical Parade had been a favorite at Disneyland for over 20 years. Expectations and apprehensions were both high as Light Magic made its debut at a private event for Disneyland Annual Passholders. The premiere night did not go well as technical problems came up with aligning the floats with the projectors, various cues were missed, and sound equipment failed, as well as the fiber-optic lighting not yet being functional. The initial show was prefaced by then Disneyland President Paul Pressler announcing to the passholder crowd that the show was to be a dress rehearsal and not the show in its finished form.

Annual Passholders are known for being both the most ardent supporters of Disneyland, while at the same time being its harshest critics. The response to the poor performance of Light Magic’s debut was very negative, with long lines extending from City Hall on Main Street demanding refunds, as passholders had paid $25 each to attend the special event under the impression, based on all of the information that had been distributed, that they would be the first to see the finished product, not a test audience with which to work out the bugs. Word of mouth reports quickly spread that Light Magic was not worth seeing. Many felt that the pixies came off a bit scary with their fake noses, cheeks, and ears, and eventually earned the nickname of Light “Tragic”.

Light Magic concept art

Light Magic played for the remainder of the summer season in 1997 with the majority of the response from the public ranging from lackluster to complete dislike. Many fans of the Main Street Electrical Parade regarded Light Magic as an unworthy replacement. Disney announced that Light Magic would be on hiatus until the year 2000, but 2000 came and went without any indication of Light Magic returning.

Small World area widened for Light Magic floats

Despite the show’s disastrous reception and short-lived run, much of the infrastructure built for Light Magic, especially in the Small World Mall area, is still used for Disneyland’s parades today. These infrastructure improvements included:

 
  • Painted asphalt along the parade route was replaced with concrete to accommodate the large, heavy show platforms
  • The plaza area in front of It’s a Small World was widened and terraced to allow more guests a better view of the parade route, similar to the way some areas of New Orleans Square were terraced for Fantasmic!.
  • A walkway was added parallel to the parade route between Storybook Land Canal Boats and It’s A Small World in order to allow guests to move in and out of the It’s A Small World area during parades. This was added in response to crowded conditions for guests during the final months of the Main Street Electrical Parade’s run.
  • Lighting towers constructed for Light Magic on Small World Mall and atop the Main Street, USA buildings allowed Disneyland to run the same parade in the afternoon and in the evening, rather than running separate afternoon and evening parades as was done for several years of the Main Street Electrical Parade’s run (e.g., The Lion King Celebration).
Three towers constructed for the Light Magic parade seen here on the Small World Mall

Three towers constructed on the Small World Mall for sound and lighting technician used in Light Magic are still standing. Two currently serve no explicit purpose, but their exterior façades are still maintained. One has been returned to service as a projection tower for Disneyland Forever.

Another spiritual successor to the Main Street Electrical Parade, the Paint the Night Parade, which also makes use of “Baroque Hoedown”, recently premiered at Disneyland on May 22, 2015, as part of the park’s 60th anniversary celebration.

 

Next up, let’s hear directly from the creative team that brought the Light Magic “streetacular” to life:

Now, why don’t we travel back to Disneyland in 1997 and see for ourselves the complete Light Magic parade:

Light Magic facts:

  • Grand opening: May 23, 1997 (Memorial Day Weekend) Annual Passholder Premiere: May 13, 1997
  • Closing date: September 1, 1997 (Labor Day Weekend)
  • Show length: 20:00
  • Cost: Approximately $20,000,000
  • Fiber Optic Cable Length Used: 4500 Miles
  • Strobe Lights: 1520

 
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Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

 
 
 


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Motion Monday: Golden Horseshoe Revue

By Keith Mahne

Welcome to another Motion Monday article here on Disney Avenue where we take a look at some special moving GIFs of Disney’s past. This time around, let’s travel to The Golden Horseshoe Saloon which opened in 1955 with several other original attractions at Disneyland. Over the years the venue has housed multiple stage shows, but none as special as the original Golden Horseshoe Revue that was the longest running show at the saloon, playing from July 17, 1955 until October 12, 1986. Today, we’ll see some scenes from the show, along with a personal introduction by Walt Disney. Continue after the page break and have a look…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

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Disney Documentary Hour – People and Places: Disneyland, U.S.A.

By Keith Mahne

In 1956, Walt Disney Productions released a featurette called Disneyland, U.S.A. in movie theaters, as part of People And Places, a series of films about geographic places. It’s essentially a 42-minute commercial for Disneyland. Now, a half century later, it’s a fascinating look at what Disneyland was like in 1956. Every single moment in this film is astonishing. The colors pull your eyes in. Seeing everyone dressed up for a day at Disneyland feels comforting. Let’s travel back to Disneyland of 1956 in this edition of Disney Avenue’s Disney Documentary Hour as we watch People and Places: Disneyland, U.S.A

Before we begin our feature presentation, take a look at this wonderful advertisement for the 1956 People and Places: Disneyland, U.S.A. These sheets were created for theater owners as it talks about how to get the trailer for the film and suggestions on placing ads. Check it out…

People and Places: Disneyland, U.S.A. was only Walt’s third CinemaScope movie. Because this film was originally created to look spectacular on a 50-foot-wide movie screen, it still remains astonishing on today’s widescreen HD televisions and computer screens.

Without further delay, Disney Avenue is proud to present People and Places: Disneyland, U.S.A. Enjoy friends…

(Please pause the Disney Avenue Music Player above if you are on a desktop computer prior to watching the video below.)

If you’d like to own your own personal copy of today’s film, make sure to grab the Walt Disney Treasures – Disneyland: Secrets, Stories & Magic DVD set…

Aside from all the other wonderful features on this DVD set, there are three audio options for Disneyland, U.S.A.

The first is the original theatrical soundtrack, enhanced to provide 5.1 surround sound. Winston Hibler is the narrator; his voice is familiar from Walt Disney’s True-Life Adventures nature film series. The musical score by Oliver Wallace is wonderful.

The second option is an audio commentary by Leonard Maltin and Tony Baxter. Don’t miss this commentary (after you’ve first viewed the film with the original soundtrack). Tony Baxter recounts all sorts of stories that he learned over his long (and still active) career with Walt Disney Imagineering.

The third option is music-only. It’s a way to enjoy the widescreen visuals and the 5.1 surround-sound Oliver Wallace score—without anyone talking over that score.

The set can be a bit pricey, but for anyone who cares about the history and development of Disneyland, don’t miss this one. You can grab your own personal copy in the Amazon link below…

 
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Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

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The Day Walt’s Dream Became A Reality: Celebrating 60 Years of Disneyland

By Keith Mahne

60 years ago today, Walt Disney’s dream that started “from a daddy with two daughters wondering where he could take them where he could have a little fun with them, too” became a reality. Disneyland is a place like no other. Walt once said, “Disneyland would be a world of past and present, seen through the eyes of my imagination – a place of warmth and nostalgia, of illusion and color and delight.” As we all know, anything created from Walt’s “imagination” is, without a doubt, going to be very special. And so, as we celebrate 60 years of magic, join me as we take a look at the creation and opening of Disneyland and the man who made it all possible…

In 1954, construction starts in Anaheim, which often continues 24 hours a day to get the park ready in time. Hollywood studios and amusement park owners couldn’t understand Walt’s concept of a “theme park,” and figured it would fail within months of opening. Burbank was the desired location, but the city rejected the project fearing the “carnie” type atmosphere and increased crime that was associated with amusement parks of the day.

Disneyland, in fact, was based much less on the traditional amusement park and much more on the world’s fair, Denmark’s Tivoli Gardens, Greenfield Village and the “garden city” concept, which also became the model for most of America’s suburbs developed during the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s (most of Disneyland’s patrons came from those suburbs, and it’s a small wonder they found it so appealing). ABC, the smallest of the three networks, begins airing the Disneyland television show, which eventually becomes the Wonderful World of Disney. The show is the first time a major Hollywood movie studio has partnered with television, and puts ABC at the top of the rankings. The hour-long show’s programming is divided into four guiding themes,  Fantasyland (Disney animated shorts),  Frontierland (the amazingly successful Davy Crocket),  Adventureland (True-Life Adventures series – the first such films to capture animals in the wild) and  Tomorrowland (original programming such as Man In Space).

(Please pause the Disney Avenue Music Player above prior to watching the videos below if you are on a desktop computer.)

Not only was the show a great way to remind audiences of Disney favorites of the past, but it also was the first time future movies were promoted using television, a practice that is now commonplace. In addition, Walt used the show to show the public plans for his theme park concept and becomes the first publicly recognizable studio head in Hollywood history.

It took a lot of work to create the happiest place on earth. See for yourself…

Join legendary Imagineer Tony Baxter on the creation of Disneyland in this wonderful video below…

Walt wanted his Park to be perfect. He wouldn’t stand for anything less and was involved in every little detail, a true testament to what Disneyland meant to him personally. This amazing video below gives you a good idea of what I mean…

Disneyland finally opens to the world on Sunday, July 17, 1955 with 18 attractions, at a cost of $17.5 million. A special ‘International Press Preview’ event was held, which was only open to invited guests. Six thousand invitations to the Grand Opening had been mailed to studio workers, construction workers, the press and officials of company sponsors.

 

 

The five original lands are Adventureland, Frontierland, Fantasyland, Tomorrowland and Main Street, USA. Opening day ceremonies are overseen by Ronald Reagan, Art Linkletter and Robert Cummings. All three will return for Disneyland’s 35th in 1990, and Art Linkletter will be present for Disneyland’s 50th in 2005. Park crowds swell to 30,000 as more than double the invited number of guests enter as people climb fences and walls around the park to get in. Most attractions break down within the first few hours and many women lose the heels of their shoes as the asphalt paving on Main Street, USA had just been poured hours earlier and was still soft. Disneyland is deemed a disaster in Anaheim, although the televised grand opening attracted the largest TV audience in history to that date – over 90 million viewers, which in 1955, was almost everyone that had the ability to view a television.

There is a great story by Wally Boag, who played the Pecos Bill/Traveling Salesman character in the Golden Horseshoe Revue, about the live, opening day broadcast…

As one of Disneyland’s Opening Day attractions, the show was to be part of the Dateline: Disneyland television program, the live broadcast seen by ninety million viewers—but in one of the many glitches that plagued the televised proceedings, Wally Boag wrote in his 2009 memoir, “our Horseshoe show didn’t get on. They were supposed to switch to the Horseshoe just as the dancers were beginning the can-can number, and they were going to shoot the reflection in the mirror that hung behind the bar.  But they were late in switching to the Horseshoe, so they only got a few seconds of the show’s closing and us taking bows.  But that was all right, because the next day, we opened up to the public and began what would eventually become the longest-running live stage show in the history of show business.”

Have a look at these absolutely breathtaking, color photos of Disneyland on opening day…

 
 
 
 
Imagine for a second the amount of stress and pressure a normal person would have if they were to create something as extravagant as Disneyland. Walt put up everything he owned to make it happen! His home, his life insurance policy, anything he owned to draw up enough funds to have Disneyland be created properly. On top of that, nearly everyone thought it would fail. What if it did? What would have happened to Walt and his dreams? What about the studio or even his family? We will never have to answer those questions because we know what happened. History was made. A dream came true. Magic became a real thing. Although I can’t help but to assume all of this was in the back of Walt’s mind, I honestly don’t believe he ever felt it would fail. And that my friends is exactly why it didn’t! He had so much faith in what he was doing that it couldn’t fail. That is what was so special about Walt.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Take for instance when Walt welcomed the very first children to enter Disneyland. Does this look like a worried man…
 
 
 
 



…not at all. Walt’s gift was knowing what people wanted and how to give it to them. Wouldn’t you have loved to be one of these lucky kids?!

One of my favorite Walt stories about him around the opening of Disneyland took place during a special pre-opening presentation of the Golden Horseshoe Revue’s first official performance. The show was staged in honor of Walt and Lillian Disney’s 30th wedding anniversary on Wednesday, July 13, 1955, four days before Disneyland would open it’s doors to the world. An invitation went out to 300 people for this “Tempus Fugit Celebration.” Walt’s daughter Diane Disney Miller explains…

“It began,” recalled Diane, “on the Mark Twain Riverboat with mint juleps and then moved over to the Golden Horseshoe Saloon for dinner and the ‘revue.’ Suddenly Dad appeared in one of the balcony boxes on the side of the stage.  At this point in the show, Wally Boag, as Pecos Bill, was firing blanks—Dad returned fire with his thumb and forefinger, then began to climb down to the stage.  I think that everyone got a bit worried—I know I did.  When he got to the stage he stood there beaming at everyone.  He was so happy.”

When Lillian Disney reluctantly joined her husband on the Golden Horseshoe stage, Walt started dancing with his bride of 30 years. Lillian didn’t know it, but Walt had taken some dancing lessons, because he knew how happy it would make her and soon everyone was dancing. Look at the photo above from that night. Walt’s Park was about to open to the entire world and, as Diane Disney mentioned, he truly was beaming.

As we celebrate 60 years of Disneyland, we celebrate not just a park, but a man with a passion. A man who was never afraid to dream. A man who loved people, knew how to make them happy, and did so no matter the cost. Disneyland is so special to so many people because it was special to Walt. He didn’t create it to make money, he created it to make people happy. He didn’t create it just to please children, nor did he do so for adults. He did so for EVERYONE! He kept the admission prices low so that every class of people could experience the magic together. And, most importantly, he did it out of love, out of a dream, out of his heart. That is why we are here celebrating 60 years, because of you Walt. We thank you for bringing so much joy to this weary world, for creating a place we can all escape to and leave our worries behind, a place…where a daddy… with two daughters… wondering where he could take them… where he could have a little fun with them, too. Thank you Walt and we sure do miss you! Here’s to 60 more magical years of your dream coming true…

 
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Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

 
 
 



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Disneyland During Walt’s Time

By Keith Mahne

 Have you ever wondered what Disneyland was like during Walt’s time? I recently set out to try and answer that question, to really get a good idea of what Disneyland was like during the years Walt was still calling the shots. I wanted to know how many people were employed, attendance figures, highlights and even what the payroll may have been. After a bit of research, I now have those answers and would like to share them here with you. Continue after the page break as we take a look at Disneyland during the years of Walt…

When Disneyland opened in 1955, employees considered their jobs to be temporary as the park was expected to fail. Musicians, actors and entertainers where given only two week contracts.

Another thing to consider when Disneyland opened in 1955 is that Anaheim had only five hotels, two motels and 34 restaurants total in the city.

The thing that was so great about Disneyland during Walt’s years was that Walt’s main concern was always for the guest and that all available money, after paying the bills of course, was to be spent on the show where the guest could see it. When an expensive administration building was proposed, Walt rejected it and stated “There isn’t going to be any administration building. The public isn’t coming here to see an administration building.” Dick Nunis told Disney historian Jim Korkis a story that Walt didn’t want to put air conditioning in the Main Street Town Hall offices because he was fearful that his supervisors would hang out inside instead of circulating throughout the park and helping with the guests.

 
 
 

Walt once rejected the design for a building with the comment: “I think the fellow is attempting a monument to himself rather than designing something that is for people.”

Below is a list of what Disneyland was like during Walt’s time:



1955

  • Attendance: 1.2 million (remember this begins from mid-July)
  • Employment: 1,280
  • Payroll: $6,350,000

Highlights:

  • Disneyland opens July 17
  • Eighteen major attractions along with three “free” non ticketed ones
  • Disneyland welcomes its 1 millionth visitor


1956
  • Attendance: 3.8 million
  • Employment: 2,190
  • Payroll: $7.8 million
Highlights:
  • Thirteen new attractions added including Tom Sawyer Island, Storybook Land Canal Boats, Skyway Journey, Astro-Jets, Junior Autopia and Rainbow Cavern Mine Train
  • “Fantasy in the Sky” fireworks display debuts
  • Disneyland welcomes its 5 millionth visitor

 
 
 



1957
  • Attendance: 4.3 million
  • Employment: 2,960
  • Payroll: $10 million
Highlights:
  • Eight new attractions added including House of the Future, Sleeping Beauty Castle Walk-Thru and Midget Autopia

     


    1958
    • Attendance: 4.4 million
    • Employment: 3,450
    • Payroll: $10.5 million
    Highlights:
    • Additions include Main Street Fire Trucks, Sailing Ship Columbia, Alice in Wonderland, Grand Canyon Diorama

       



      1959
      • Attendance: 5 million
      • Employment: 3,650
      • Payroll: $12 million
      Highlights:
      • Submarine Voyage, Disneyland-Alweg Monorail, Matterhorn Mountain and Bobsleds, Motor Boat Cruise added
      • Tradition of Rose Bowl teams visiting Disneyland begins with the University of Washington and the University of Wisconsin
      • Premier Krushchev of Russia denied Disneyland visit

       
       
       
      1960
      • Attendance: 4.9 million
      • Employment: 3,693
      • Payroll: $12.2 million
      Highlights
      • Nature’s Wonderland, America the Beautiful and Art of Animation
      • Total number of park attractions: 45
      • Disneyland hosted its first Private Party for outside groups on May 13th when 5,042 Knight of Columbus enjoyed exclusive use of Disneyland 

       



      1961
      • Attendance: 4.7 million
      • Employment: 3,819
      • Payroll: $12.5 million
      Highlights:
      • Disneyland-Alweg Monorail system expands to connect with Disneyland Hotel
      • New and popular attraction: Flying Saucers
      • First all-night Grad Nite Party held in June
      • Tinker Bell begins summer flights from peak of Matterhorn to set off “Fantasy In the Sky” fireworks

       


      1962
      • Attendance: 5.1 million
      • Employment: 3,880
      • Payroll: $13 million
      Highlights:
      • Swiss Family Robinson Treehouse, Safari Game Shoot, Plaza Pavilion Restaurant, Tahitian Terrace and new scenes on Jungle Cruise

       
      1963
      • Attendance: 5.6 million
      • Employment: 4,106
      • Payroll: $13.8 million
      Highlights:
      • Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room
      • First cultural exhibit: “Salute to Mexico”

       
       

      1964
      • Attendance: 5.9 million
      • Employment: 4,190
      • Payroll: $15 million
      Highlights:
      • Below deck sailing quarters on Columbia Sailing Ship and Trapped Safari/African Veldt added to Jungle Cruise
      • “Fantasy On Parade” Christmas parade debuts

       


      1965
      • Attendance: 6.4 million
      • Employment: 4,590
      • Payroll: $15,500,000
      Highlights:
      • Celebration of Disneyland Tencennial
      • Very first Disneyland Ambassador: Julie Reihm




      1966
      • Attendance: 6.7 million
      • Employment: 4,580
      • Payroll: $18,800,000
      Highlights:
      • “it’s a small world,” Primeval World addition, New Orleans Square

       
       
       
       
      During the year after Walt passed in 1967, Disneyland celebrated the opening of Pirates of the Caribbean and the New Tomorrowland with the Peoplemover, Carousel of Progress, a re-designed Flight to the Moon and Rocket Jets. Also in 1967, attendance jumped to almost 8 million and in 1968 to just over 9 million and then stayed at roughly 10 million people a year every year up until 1979. In 1968, employment jumped to 5,510 and at the end of 1979 it was up to 7,609 while payroll in 1968 was $25.4 million and by 1979, $66.4 million.

      

      Walt once said, “Disneyland is not just another amusement park. It’s unique, and I want it kept that way. Besides, you don’t work for a dollar—you work to create and have fun.” Thanks Walt!
      Thanks to Jim Korkis for sharing these Disneyland statistics with us.

       

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      Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.



      Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.    

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      A Walk in the Park: Disneyland Edition – Summertime at Disneyland

      By Daisy Sparks

      Hello, Disney Avenue! Summer is here, people are on vacation, and they all seem to be at Disneyland. I have a little bit of everything to share with you this week for our “Walk in the Park” so we better not waste a single second. Continue after the page break and let’s go enjoy the magic of Disneyland…

      Continue reading A Walk in the Park: Disneyland Edition – Summertime at Disneyland

      Vintage Disneyland Gate Brochures

      By Keith Mahne

      Wouldn’t it be fun if we were able to travel back in time and spend a day at Disneyland? Although that capability isn’t yet available to us optimists, we do have the ability to see what the day to day activities were like at Disneyland by taking a look at the Park’s old main gate brochures. Given to guests as they entered the park, these handy flyers were packed with all the current festivities and attractions. They also provided which type of ticket (A,B,C,D or E) each attraction required. Today, let’s have a look at some of these wonderful brochures from 1968, 1976, and 1979 to really get a sense of what Disneyland had to offer its guests all those years ago. Continue after the page break for a nostalgic look into Disneyland’s past…

      (Click on each brochure to enlarge the photo.)

      Let’s begin by having a look inside this fantastic Disneyland brochure from Spring of 1968…

       

      Did you see what was in Tomorrowland? Bell System’s futuristic Picture-phone exhibit! It was the Skype of 1968! That’s pretty cool technology for back then and more on that to come in a future article…

      Next, we travel to Disneyland during the Summer of 1976! Notice that the Mine Train Through Nature’s Wonderland is still chugging along, but will soon close for good a few months later on January 2, 1977…

      Lastly, take a look at this brown beauty from Winter of 1979. In it you’ll see a great little Space Mountain advertisement. Big Thunder Mountain isn’t ready just yet as its got about 7 months before it becomes the “wildest ride in the wilderness!”…

       
       
       
      Did you see anything in these great brochures of old Disneyland that stood out to you? If so, be sure to let us know in the comments! I swear I could look at these for hours! 
       
       
       
       
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      Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.
       

      Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

       
       
       

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      A Walk in the Park: Disneyland Edition – Enchanted Windows

      By Daisy Sparks

      Hello, Disney Avenue readers! It’s time to visit Disneyland again. It’s pretty exciting when places or things that have been around at Disneyland for a long time can be re-imagined. An example of this is the beginning of the new “Enchanted Windows” series along Main St. USA.

      Let’s take a look at these magical Disneyland windows along Main Street in this week’s Walk in the Park article…

      The windows along the Emporium used to showcase classic Disney movies from Snow White, to Little Mermaid to Ratatouille. They started as elaborate dioramas to having more recent window displays with animated figures. You can visit Daveland to see some photos of how the Emporium display windows have evolved.

      Back in May, the Disney Parks Blog announced that new “Enchanted Window” displays would be in place for the Diamond Celebration. You can refer to this post for more photos about these new Main Street USA window enhancements.

      Since then, there have been two Enchanted Windows that have been revealed: Peter Pan and Cinderella. Take a look at this video I shot just for you:

      Here are some photos from the new Peter Pan Enchanted Window. It debuted late May to coincide with the official start of Disneyland’s Diamond Celebration.

      Several weeks ago, the Cinderella Enchanted Window was quietly revealed with the following scene.

      I am glad that they were not revealed all at once. It’s fun to continue to get some Disney magic every now and then. I can’t wait to see the others and to share it with Disney Avenue.

      See you in the parks…

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      Daisy Sparks grew up in Southern California and Disneyland was a regular part of her life. While in college, she started working at Disneyland as a Main Street Merchandise Host. Her “college job” led to 12 adventurous years working with Mickey Mouse. She was a trained Magic Demonstrator, Hat Writer and was even signed off as a Disneyland Monorail Ride Operator. Daisy loved every minute of it while she held various management positions in Merchandise, Business Operations and Attractions. 
      Daisy is married to her college sweetheart, David (a former Jungle Cruise Skipper). David solicited Daisy’s Duck’s help in memorable engagement proposal that took place at Disneyland’s Club 33. Daisy left Disneyland in May 2001 to raise her two daughters. She continues to visit the Disneyland Resort multiple times a week as a Guest. Daisy particularly loves the Disneyland heritage because of all of the little details and stories that make it “the happiest place on earth.”
      You can read more about Daisy’s Disneyland adventures over on her personal blog at DisneyDaze .

      You can find all of Daisy’s articles here.

       
       
       
      
      

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      Disney Documentary Hour: A Day at Disneyland – 1982

      By Keith Mahne

      Welcome back to a very popular segment here on Disney Avenue called Disney Documentary Hour where we have a look at some amazing videos throughout Disney history. Today, we’ll get to see a real favorite called A Day at Disneyland from 1982! This video took viewers on a tour of Disneyland, as they watched their favorite Disney characters experience the many rides, shops, restaurants and attractions in the park. Continue after the page break and have a look…

      A Day at Disneyland is a 1982 official Walt Disney Home Video release which has been out for print for many years. It’s a great tour of the park, and includes great footage of several now defunct attractions, including America Sings and the original Bear Country.

      And now, A Day at Disneyland….Enjoy!

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      Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

      Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

       
      You can find all of Keith’s articles here.
       

      

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