A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World – An Evening in the Vacation Kingdom

By Keith Mahne

We return to our musical journey through Walt Disney World’s past with an evening in the Vacation Kingdom. We’ll hop on the Monorail after spending a wonderful day at the Magic Kingdom and head on over to the Contemporary and Polynesian Resorts for a night of fun. If you’re all set, let’s head to the monorail station…

Part 14: An Evening in the Vacation Kingdom

(If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9, Part 10, Part 11, Part 12 and Part 13 of our musical journey of vintage Walt Disney World, please check them out before continuing. Also, be sure to pause the Disney Avenue Music Player in the top left-hand corner of this page if you are on a desktop computer.)

 
 
 
 
 
 
Here are Foxx’s notes on the creation of Track 14 – An Evening in the Vacation Kingdom:
 
 
 

14) An Evening in the Vacation Kingdom

My hope had always been to complete the Musical Souvenir with a tour of the hotels, stopping at each and ending with the Electrical Water Pageant. When this proved too ambitious for Version 1, I scaled back considerably. Still, this is the reason why the Magic kingdom Express Monorail runs in the wrong direction in Track 1, moving clockwise instead of counter clockwise around the lagoon. I wanted the entrance and exit monorail rides to together complete a full loop around the Lagoon.

Upon arriving at the Contemporary, I was faced with the problem of recreating the distinctive “pop-hiss” of the original monorail doors opening. I ended up using a video uploaded to YouTube by Jeff Lange as reference material in re-creating the sound myself. The “bang” of the door opening is that sound of a dryer door being pulled open, and the pneumatic “hiss” is the piston underneath an office chair being extended.

From the monorail platform, Mariachi Chaparral can be heard performing “Guadajahara” from “A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom”. WDW has maintained a mariachi group since 1971, bizarrely enough. In the old days, they performed in Frontierland, and eventually moved permanently (and changed names) to the Contemporary. In 1982, they moved to EPCOT Center and again changed names.

Mariachi music is not my thing. If this project has anything resembling a “nemesis”, it was Mariachi Chaparral. I found it next to impossible to include this historical curio and retain anything like the correct atmosphere, which is why their performance here is so truncated. The echo and crowd warble is modeled closely on live recordings taken of the Contemporary concourse in late 2013. Still, anyone who’s seen The Magic of walt Disney World will vividly remember the reveal of Mariachi Chaparral as the monorail glides into the contemporary, and the fact is that what you see there was real, so it was nice to keep them in the project, if only as a grace note.

Canyon Terrace Lounge – I had known that the Contemporary had housed a jazz organist in its first few months, but was unable to find any more details until a December 1971 Orlando-land Magazine review of dinner at the Contemporary uncovered a name: Jackie Davis. And, fortunately, Jackie was as prolific a recording artist as he was a musician.

I wanted to choose a recording from as close to Jackie’s days at the Contemporary as possible, and ended up using his own composition “Slippery” from his 1970 LP “Here’s Jackie” on Kei-Mar Records.

Contemporary Concourse Music – One of the great moments in the creation of this collection was in finding these tracks. The release of the first version of the Souvenir put me in touch with a MouseBits user by the name of “ralphdude”. “Ralphdude”, or Eric, as it turns out had an intimate connection with the old Contemporary music. Back in the late 70s, one could turn on their in-room television and hear the resort’s ambient music, which Eric did one night, turned on his nearby tape recorder, and went to bed.

Although the source tape is now gone, Eric spent the next several decades scouring old recordings looking for exactly the right tracks. He found about an hour’s worth of material, mostly by digging through CDs, and graciously sent his results along to me.

I began by backtracking to the vinyl records Jack Wagner would’ve worked off of, and found to my pleasure that none post-dated 1971, making this match extremely likely. A great deal of it was Henry Mancini and Burt Bacharach, or standard “easy listening” material of the era. There was a specific focus on music from 1968 – 1971, which at first puzzled me. Then I remembered that Jack Wagner would’ve had very little idea what the final hotel would be like in person; I’m sure he was simply shown a painting and told “that’s the Contemporary Hotel.” Given the instructions to create an atmosphere loop for a “Contemporary Hotel”, the impulse to reach for contemporary hits is obvious. This convinced me that Eric’s selections were most likely correct.

I chose two Henry Mancini tracks: “Daydreams” from his terrific Peter Gunn soundtrack, and “In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning”, from his lovely piano album “A Warm Shade of Ivory”. This music would’ve played in the hotel lobby, shopping concourse, and convention center.

Polynesian Village – the Polynesian has always been special to me, which is why I wanted to end the Musical Souvenir at this most Walt Disney World of hotels. No offense Contemporary, but you’re no Polynesian.

The Polynesian Village BGM has changed several times over the years. Since our project is laid circa 1977-78, I wanted to be certain to get the earliest possible version of the background music. Fortunately. Dave McCormick was fascinated by this music, and recorded several lengthy excerpts of it in 1983.

One of the tracks he captured was “Stars Over Maui”, recorded by the 101 Strings on their album “In a Hawaiian Paradise”. This same track also appears in the Adventureland Veranda track dated 1973 but which I believe is from 1971. This was confirmed by Dave, because his recording reveals that the version of “Stars Over Maui” played at the Polynesian Village still has the chimes that Wagner dubbed over the track for the Veranda, meaning that Jack couldn’t remove them for his Polynesian loop. Most accounts seem to agree that it took a few years for everything in WDW to get background loops, so this audio artifact suggests that the audio Dave captured could’ve been in place by 1972 or 1973.

From there I brought Dave’s live recordings to the Tiki Central forums, where John Charles Watson identified the remaining tracks for me. The source recordings were then mixed with live recordings made in the Polynesian in October 2013 to get the proper waterfall ambience. The Al Caiola version of “Blue Hawaii”, by the way, was the reason I changed the George Bruns Adventureland Veranda track to “Moonlight and Shadows’.

Incidentally, Dave did capture some live ambience in The Golf Resort, which was simply outside the realm of possibility for this presentation. Music seemed only to play in the check-in lobby and restaurant, and was definitely classical music – sounded like Chopin to me. There’s no better spot to preserve this information, so here it is.

Great Ceremonial House – In September 2013 I recorded each of the four sides of the now-defunct Lobby Waterfall to mix into this directional audio mix, as well as the crucial sound of the old automatic doors hissing as they open. The music which faintly plays here in “Maui Girl” by the Diamond Head Beachcombers. This ambiance was recorded just months before the removal of this beautiful lobby feature and I’m very proud to have preserved something of its beauty.

Tambu Lounge – In the process of researching names of old WDW resort music acts, I ran into lots of dead ends. One of the first I found something concrete for was Jim Hession, who held court on piano at the Polynesian for twenty years. After Disney, Jim worked as a Bourbon Street jazz pianist and uploaded many, many videos to YouTube under the name “JimMartha Hession”. Jim’s lovely version of Duke Ellington’s “Black Beauty” seemed to strike the right note for a quiet evening over drinks at the Polynesian.

The bar atmosphere here is courtesy “Crowd In A Bar.wav” by Leandros.Ntounis from Freesound.com, as well as samples of “Glass Bottles 02.wav” by dheming. Several times a cocktail shaker may be heard, and that is me.

It took some effort to mix the Tambu Lounge correctly because I did not know it was relocated in the early 1990s to be out in the lobby. The original Tambu Lounge location was taken over by an expansion of the nearby restaurant; what remains of it is a quiet side corridor alongside a row of windows overlooking the pool.

Pepeete Bay Veranda – Disney’s insistence on only hiring the best performers available seldom paid off as handsomely in my research as it did in the case of Hal Aloma, a classical Hawaiian performer who had already had a long career before Disney took him on in 1971 to play at the Polynesian. At Disney he was accompanied only by a trio, so I was anxious to recreate the intimate nature of the sound of his tenure there. His late-60s “Lure of the Islands” LP seemed appropriate.

The restrained applause here is “Crowd -4” by Aiwha on Freesound.org.

Captain Cook’s Hideaway – From 1972 to 1979, Walt Disney World played host to the nearest they would ever come to a cult music act – Gary Stratton and Bob Christopher, known as “Saltwater Express”. This folk-pop duo cracked jokes and entertained Cast Members until 2 am at the Polynesian Village’s intimate bar, Captain Cook’s Hideaway.

In 1972, Disney leveraged the popularity of Saltwater Express to aid in humiliating the local Orlando government into improving SR 535, a narrow, unlit country road which Disney was now funneling thousands of Cast Members down a day for use as the “Cast Member Entrance” to the property. Orlando contended that Disney should contribute because it was their employees which caused the problem, Disney shot back that the road was not on their private property. As a salvo, Disney got Stratton and Christopher to record a novelty song: “Will You Arrive Alive on 535?”, and got local radio stations to play it. A sample lyric:

“It was a beautiful ride back in 1905,

In a horse and buggy on a Sunday drive,

Even Bonnie and Clyde back in ’25,

Would have taken I-4 instead of 535″

Disney also encouraged Cast Members to write letters to their congressmen campaigning for road safety and published photos of accidents in their Cast newsletter. Ultimately, Disney won and got the road widened on government money.

Naturally, Saltwater Express was high on my wish list. Sadly, both Gary and Chris have gone missing, and efforts to locate archival copies of their hit song “Arrive Alive on 535” seemed fruitless. I knew that Saltwater Express had appeared in a truly deranged 1975 Grand Nite promotional film, as pied pipers leading the high school seniors to the Magic Kingdom, which had been shown once at the 2011 Destination D event in Florida. The likelihood of obtaining that film from the Disney Archives was non-existent.

On a tip from a Disney video collector, I drove up to the State of Florida Archives in Tallahassee, where a section of the Disney media is available for perusal. In there I found a reel of the Grad Nite film mislabeled, and was able to thread up the film and capture the audio to my computer. After some digital clean up and editing, Saltwater Express were back in the Musical Souvenir.

I saved them for last for good reason.

Near the end of the project, the Polynesian Luau show can be heard across the lagoon as the Electrical Water Pageant pulls in. No complete record of a 70s era Luau exists, but YouTube user “Joel Upchurch” has uploaded a luau from April 1983, and this is what I used.

Electrical Water Pageant – the original ELP music, which premiered October 20, 1971, was simply the legendary “Baroque Hoedown” by Jean-Jacques Perrey and Gershon Kingsley written in 1966. The tune was later used for the Main Street Electrical Parade at Disneyland, and when the parade was going to be duplicated for the Magic Kingdom in 1977 following the end of the run of America on Parade, the Water Pageant was due for a new soundtrack. This was supervised by Jack Wagner and recorded by Don Dorsey and James Christensen in 1977.

This source track, which is of excellent quality, was from the Wagner estate complete with his hand-written notations and is available for listening online at WaltsMusic.Com. This is not the complete show – it’s about half its length, including only the most famous and representative tracks. This 1977 version of the Pageant ran until 1991, when it was replaced with the current version, which primarily uses pop songs and cues from “The Little Mermaid”. I’d added live Seven Seas Lagoon waves and some echo to approximate the sound of music bouncing off water. I knew from the start that this was the only appropriate way to end a full day in the Vacation Kingdom of the past.



There’s nothing like being in the Vacation Kingdom of the World at night! This wonderful An Evening in the Vacation Kingdom track has been added to the Disney Avenue Music Player for you to listen to whenever you’d like.

Well friends, that about does it for our musical adventure of Walt Disney World’s past. Sadly, all good things must come to an end. However, if you would like to download these tracks for yourself, here is the link to Foxx Nolte’s page and her amazing Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World creation. As I said in the beginning of this adventure, a BIG THANK YOU goes out to Foxx and her contributors for making this truly spectacular musical journey possible for us all to reminisce and enjoy. I hope you had a wonderful time over these past two weeks, I know I sure did! It’s always special being able to travel back to the good ol’ days of Walt Disney World…the TRUE Vacation Kingdom of the World!

******
 
 
 
 
 

Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

You can find all of Keith’s articles here.


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A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World – Magic Kingdom by Starlight

By Keith Mahne

The Magic Kingdom at night is always a special time. It’s like the Park transforms into a whole new world. What would it be like to walk the park under the stars in the early days? Well let’s find out in the next edition of our Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World experience…

Part 13: Magic Kingdom by Starlight

(If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9, Part 10, Part 11 and Part 12 of our musical journey of vintage Walt Disney World, please check them out before continuing. Also, be sure to pause the Disney Avenue Music Player in the top left-hand corner of this page if you are on a desktop computer.)

Here are Foxx’s notes on the creation of Track 13 – Magic Kingdom by Starlight:

13) The Magic Kingdom by Starlight

It is at this point that Version 2 of the Souvenir begins to diverge most radically from Version 1. I had always hoped to create a more inclusive tour of early Walt Disney World than simply the Magic Kingdom, but my resources in 2011 simply prevented it. However, the release of that first version did cause certain people who had other obscurities to seek me out, and it is thanks to them that I’ve realized my original vision here in version 2.

One thing to note is that the project is intended to recall the passing of an entire day in the park. The frantic music and sounds of the Seven Seas Lagoon in the Overture recall a morning arrival, the Fantasyland glockenspiel chimes 3’o clock in track 9, and Michael Iceberg references “Saturday Night at the World”, and finally the crickets and sounds of the Florida brush can be heard here in Track 13 (“Night Forest” by user Dobroide on Freesound).

Just as it still is at Disneyland, evenings in the Magic Kingdom once effortlessly evoked sophistication, and meant starlight, dancing, and high quality music acts. I was lucky that some of these acts actually cut records.

We begin at the Fantasy Faire stage near Pincocchio Village Haus, which at night was the home of Nick Russo & Gabriel’s Brass, an adult contemporary swing band in the style of Herb Alpert. Nick Russo was a gifted trumpet player, nicknamed “Gabriel” by Ethel Merman after the song in “Anything Goes”. By the mid 1970s he alternated between Walt Disney World and Cypress Gardens with a retinue of a dozen musicians.

Following the end of the Jackie Gleason show in 1970, Nick struck out for Florida and cut a record with Miami’s Gentry records, using the opportunity to triple the size of his usual accompanying group. In that sense, the sound heard here is quite a bit “richer” than Gabriel’s Brass would’ve sounded at the Magic Kingdom, but the repertoire and era of the music is exactly right. The name of the record is “An Angel is Love” and the song featured here is the lovely, melancholy “How Will I Know You”.

Exiting Fantasyland, another of the original 1971 Carrousel tracks can be heard – “It’s A Small World”, again from the “Treasures of Fantasy” box set. The “Hub at Night” section includes Cinderella Castle’s clock chiming, which it hasn’t done for many years – the sound is captured from The Magic of Walt Disney World, instead.

The next group to play is Bill Allred’s terrific Reedy Creek Jazz Band. Bill Allred was the original head of the Magic Kingdom’s Pearly Band, and struck out on his own in 1973 to form his Reedy Creek Jazz Band with an assortment of other Disney musicians. They became the band in residence at the the Maison et Jardin in Altamonte Springs, and often played Church Street Station. Disney, for their part, kept Bill coming back for special events and parties. His appearance at the Plaza Pavilion for Walt Disney World’s bicentennial provided the inspiration for this selection.

It’s a choice I’m glad I made. Once I obtained Allred’s terrific 1974 Dixieland jazz record “Reedy Creek Romp!”, I was nearly obligated to include it. Everything from the style, to the name, to Allred’s past experience at WDW, made it as Disney-relevant as an outside act can be. Even the cover photograph, taken at Fort Wilderness, was snapped by Pat Terry Jr. the younger of Liberty Square’s two “Banjo Kings”.

“Reedy Creek Romp”, Allred’s original composition, is a perfect fit for the park by starlight. Bill returned to Disney in the 1990s, by the way, and works there to this day.

Main Street USA Evening Loop – Michael Sweeney and I were able to confirm the existence of the MK evening loop in 2012, previously an obscurity, so in the interest of accuracy it seemed appropriate to exit the park to the jazzy strains of this loop.

One thing listeners familiar with version 1 will immediately notice about the revised edition is my exclusion of the medley of Buddy Baker instrumental tracks at the head of Track 13. The main justification for this in the older version was to compensate for what I considered to be a weak ending of the project, And also to end the project with an airing of “When You Wish Upon a Star”, which has been the traditional ending of Walt Disney World and Disneyland promotional films since the 1960s. I was ready to write this off until I realized that “When You Wish” played in the Magic Kingdom entrance loop from 1971, a loop I had excluded from the “Arrival” section for emotional and pacing reasons.

The Frank Chacksfeild Orchestra version proved exactly the perfect note to leave the Magic Kingdom with. The interior of the monorail is the sound of my old Dell PC tower running, and the monorail doors slamming is a standard car door. The exit from the Magic Kingdom is accompanied by a 1978 Jack Wagner narration culled from WaltsMusic.Com.

So beautiful isn’t it?! I, like many, absolutely love the Magic Kingdom at night. It’s so beautiful in ways you may not realize during the day. How special it is to be able to travel back to the Magic Kingdom under a beautiful night sky.

We’ll wrap up this musical exploration of Walt Disney World’s past tomorrow by spending an evening in the Vacation Kingdom….that’s right, the whole Resort as it was originally at night…

…let’s go relax on the resort loop. This wonderful Magic Kingdom by Starlight track has been added to the Disney Avenue Music Player for you to listen to whenever you’d like. See you right back here tomorrow where we’ll conclude our tour of vintage Walt Disney World by spending an evening in the Vacation Kingdom of the World…see you soon.

******
 
 
 
 
 


Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.
Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.
You can find all of Keith’s articles here.
 
 
 
 

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A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World – If You Had Wings

By Keith Mahne

Welcome back friends to A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World! Today, we’ll take a ride on the beloved and long gone If You Had Wings attraction. It’s going to be a great time, so if your all set and ready to roll, let’s get right to it…

Part 12: If You Had Wings

(If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9, Part 10 and Part 11 of our musical journey of vintage Walt Disney World, please check them out before continuing. Also, be sure to pause the Disney Avenue Music Player in the top left-hand corner of this page if you are on a desktop computer.)

Here are Foxx’s notes on the creation of Track 12 – If You Had Wings:

12) If You Had Wings

This final Tomorrowland track was the impetus for the entire version 1 project, and was in fact the first completed. Several years ago, thanks to the efforts of people like Mike Lee and Michael Sweeney, as well as a dedicated cadre of researchers in California, it was becoming increasingly possible to attempt an aural rebuild of the Magic Kingdom as it appeared in its first ten years. The problem was that the If You Had Wings source music was totally unavailable. A demo version had been circulating online for some years, and although quite satisfactory, I could not in my conscience present a demo as a faithful reconstruction of actual music heard in the Magic Kingdom.

In the summer of 2011, the files appeared on WaltsMusic.Com. Although a little tinny and beat up, these were the authentic attraction source files, and I began work on a flow-through version at once. My goal was to keep the improved legibility of the new source while still giving some sense of the overlapping riot of sound which characterized this attraction. For reference I used a number of live recordings made available by Mike Lee and Eric Paddon as well as videos on YouTube – not just of If you Had Wings, but also its replacement attraction, If You Could Fly, which lasted deeper into the home video boom and helped give me some idea of the aural environment of the show despite it’s different score.

The track is as accurate as I can get it, but there are a few things which should be noted. First, following the “waterfall” scene (You could flitter and flutter to the isle of springs…), a steel drum musical track is heard, followed by a jazz band, and then the New Orleans scene’s vocal track. This steel drum track is something of an orphan. The sequencing of the track in the source file, which I assume closely follows the reel-to-reel tape from the Wagner collection it is recorded from, suggests that the steel drums may have been intended for this spot, and indeed the Caribbean and Puerto Rico segments of the ride are the only places where this particular track makes sense. But based on live recordings, it wasn’t in this section, but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t simply removed or for one reason or another inaudible. At this point in the track, myself and the audience needed an instrumental break, so I re-ordered both this track and the jazz track to provide a better listening experience.

The dislocation of the track becomes more interesting, however — because it appears at the very end of the ride in two, and only two, of the six reference recordings I have, right before the Unload area where the narrator intones “You do have wings!” In the other four recordings, this small but important space plays the “Airbus” (Load Area) theme. I left it in the ending in the version 1 release but have removed it for version 2, after several years of perspective. This makes If You Had Wings the only track in version 2 of this project shorter than the version 1 edit!

One thing missing from the WaltsMusic.Com reel-to-reel tape is the infamous “You Do Have Wings” exit music, so this reconstruction uses the demo tape version, which isn’t a bad match. The final piece of music that closes out Tomorrowland, the mellow reprise of the main theme, is very interesting and I’ve never run across any unimpeachable evidence that it actually played in situ in the Magic Kingdom, but if it did, it probably played right near the exit door where the Eastern Airlines reservation counter was located.

Despite my best efforts, the resulting track still didn’t sound like If You Had Wings until I put in several layers of 16mm projector noise – the attraction housed over 40 16mm projectors and one reason the ride was so loud was to drown out all those projectors humming along in the dark. I sourced the 16mm sound from Freesound.org – file “Projector16mm-2” by user Espectral. The fireworks in the New Orleans section closely match the sound effects played in the ride – which was probably just a needle drop rack anyway, these are “Fireworks” by user Dobroide on Freesound. Finally, I included a subtle waterfall effect in the “waterfall” scene – there was an actual pool of water and waterfall in this scene of the attraction which seemed to flow seamlessly out of the projected image and which provided some significant room tone. I elected for a quieter and less disruptive sound, it is “Small_water_fall_in_the_woods_2” by user Voliveri.

The track begins with a brief section where we “ride the WEDway” into the attraction. This is mixed from the Todd Becker 1980 WEDway live recording, a live recording of the WEDway in December 2011 (to get the clanking sound), and a pitch-corrected version of the WaltsMusic source file, which I modified to sound more like it was playing over the WEDway speakers.

Thanks also to Dolbyman at MouseBits for sending a slightly cleaned up copy of the If You Had Wings source music.

If only we could take one more ride on this long gone Tomorrowland attraction, huh? Not to worry, we’ll always have this wonderful track to soothe our needs.

Friends, tomorrow your going to hear something REALLY special! We’ll be taking a stroll of the Magic Kingdom by Starlight…

…it’s going to be truly magical! This wonderful If You Had Wings track has been added to the Disney Avenue Music Player for you to listen to whenever you’d like. See you right back here tomorrow where we’ll continue our tour of vintage Walt Disney World and visit the Magic Kingdom under the stars…

 
******
 
 
 
 

 
Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

You can find all of Keith’s articles here.
 
 
 
 

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A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World – Tomorrowland Pt 2

By Keith Mahne

Welcome travels to our trip through Walt Disney World’s past. Today, we’ll continue our walk through vintage Tomorrowland with some Michael Iceberg songs, a ride on the 1975 version of the General Electric Carousel of Progress, and more. Let’s not waste another second, here now is part 2 of our vintage Tomorrowland tour as we continue on our Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World

Part 11: Tomorrowland Pt. 2

(If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8, Part 9 and Part 10 of our musical journey of vintage Walt Disney World, please check them out before continuing. Also, be sure to pause the Disney Avenue Music Player in the top left-hand corner of this page if you are on a desktop computer.)

 
 
 
 
 
 


Here are Foxx’s notes on the creation of Track 11 – Tomorrowland Pt 2:

11) Tomorrowland, Part Two

This is the second track in the project which is entirely unaltered from version 1. Because why mess with perfection?

Michael Iceberg burst onto the Disney scene in mid-July 1976 and was from the first an immediate sensation. Rising from the Utilidor of the Magic Kingdom surrounded by buttons and knobs and backed by a huge reflective mirror, Iceberg (then Iseberg) looked the very definition of a “geek”: bottle cap glasses, scraggly hair, an absurd outfit that looked like it was swiped from Forbidden Planet between takes. As he sang and played rock ditties which flowed into each other like a stream of consciousness on his homemade synthesizer, he’d grimace and mumble lyrics amid swirling fog machines and strobing lights. Eyes and Ears had no idea how to describe the act: “…it is best for you to drop by and catch a performance yourself …then you try describing it to your friends!”

Iceberg was an immediate fixture of the Magic Kingdom. Gradually, his act was refined. He focused less on rock music and more on Disney tunes and classical numbers, played more gracefully. The glasses went away. His hair was neatly combed and he wore a black suit and tie, looking like a dignified mad scientist overseeing an experiment. Eventually the look of the Iceberg Machine was simplified into a mirrored pyramid, which opened at the top like an erupting volcano revealing Iceberg working the keyboard. Steve Birnbaum called Iceberg a “Disney superstar”. Hunter S. Thompson wryly observed: “Now there’s somebody crazier than I am.” It is all true, yet none of it is enough.

This sample Iceberg performance is edited down from his LP “Michael Iceberg Does It Live! 100th Week at Walt Disney World”. Because most of Iceberg’s act is a simple demonstration of what synthesizers can do, this record is quite dreadful and often unlistenable as Iceberg produces farm animal noises and wind effects for the amusement of his audience. In later years, one part of his act involved re-recording his synthesizer’s “audience boos”, encouraging his audience to jeer him and playing the sounds back with a satisfied comment about how enthusiastically they’ve booed him. But when Iceberg gets into the musical groove on this record, astonishingly strange and wonderful music can result. This track is the combined best parts of his concert. Other synthesizer adopters of the era produced music that was either frankly experimental and spare or in a classical style, taking advantage of the device’s ability to produce an entire symphony of sound. Iceberg plays music that seems to come from another dimension, simultaneously recalling 60s and 70s pop while looking forward to techno, electro-pop and house. It is a bizarre space-age mélange perched on the edge of hysteria.

Whether he be in the Tomorrowland Terrace or the Tomorrowland Theater built in 1980 south of the Carousel of Progress, Iceberg’s music was an essential part of night time at Walt Disney World, between dizzying spins on Space Mountain and laps on the Grand Prix. I am pleased to bring this unique sensory pleasure back to the world through this music set.

The General Electric Carousel of Progress – The 1975 version of the Carousel of Progress has never really gotten much attention. I don’t know if this is because it was moved out of Disneyland after only a short stay and ended up “down in Florida”, out of sight and mind. Maybe it was because this was the first attraction to depart significantly from a Walt Disney original, or perhaps it’s because of Richard Sherman’s disparaging remarks about the quality of the “Now is the Time” song – remarks which only ever reflected his affection for the original tune it replaced, which was bound up in his relationship to Walt Disney. It’s actually a shame that Sherman made those remarks, because they deflect attention away from the 1975 show itself, and it’s really good. It’s a very solid show which finds an amenable middle ground between the rosy-hued optimism of the 1964 version and the realities of post-Watergate, post-Vietnam America without descending into condescending sophistry like the 1994 version.

The truth is that the 1975 show was a very strong effort with a superb script, and put up against something like, say, the Shermans’ “Computer Song” for EPCOT Center, “Now Is The Time” has nothing to apologize for. Buddy Baker’s score is simply excellent, one of his best efforts, very much in the vein of the work he did for America Sings just a few months earlier. Probably the biggest problem with the 1975 show is that Andrew Duggan, the new actor in the “Father” role, simply isn’t very good at singing. His enthusiasm carries the show passably, but you’ll notice he occasionally lags somewhat behind the music. Then again, this may be the fault of the unknown mixer who compiled all this music somewhat carelessly. Recording sessions are available on WaltsMusic.Com, but I ended up using the versions uploaded to MouseBits.Com under the name “Carousel of Progress – Collection” uploaded by use poogy71, which have superior sound quality.

The final Carousel cue is unique to the ‘75 show, an arrangement of “Now Is the Time” performed in calliope style, which perhaps hits the “carousel” note too much on the head but which I find delightful anyway.  It circulates in some places as “exit music”; actually this incidental cue played under Father’s welcome in the Loading scene.

 
 
 
Wasn’t that wonderful?!? What I wouldn’t give to hear another live Michael Iceberg performance in Tomorrowland. Tomorrow we’ll take a ride on the beloved and long gone If You Had Wings attraction…
 
 
 
 
 
 
…I can’t wait! This wonderful Tomorrowland track has been added to the Disney Avenue Music Player for you to listen to whenever you’d like. See you right back here tomorrow where we’ll continue our tour of vintage Walt Disney World and revisit the If You Had Wings attraction!
 
 
 
 
*****
 
 
 
 
 
Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

 
 

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A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World – Tomorrowland Pt 1

By Keith Mahne

As we continue our musical journey through Walt Disney World’s past, we enter Tomorrowland of yesteryear. For many Disney World patrons, this particular time in Tomorrowland history was a favorite. Today, we’ll revisit this moment in time with A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World as our vehicle to the past. Grab those headphones, sit back and relax as we enter Walt Disney World’s Tomorrowland of old…

Part 10: Tomorrowland Pt. 1

(If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7, Part 8 and Part 9 of our musical journey of vintage Walt Disney World, please check them out before continuing. Also, be sure to pause the Disney Avenue Music Player in the top left-hand corner of this page if you are on a desktop computer.)

Here are Foxx’s notes on the creation of Track 10 – Tomorrowland Pt 1:

10) Tomorrowland, Part One

Earlier in this piece, I called out the Frontierland track as one of the big reasons to move ahead with a second version of the audio project. The other big reason was my dissatisfaction with the first Tomorrowland track. It’s odd to think that as recently as three years ago, there was simply no information about the historical “sound” of Tomorrowland in existence. Enervated by the first version of this project, I was eventually able to fill these gaps and present a more or less complete chronology. This, as much as these tracks, represents some of my proudest moments as a WDW researcher.

The original Tomorrowland area music emanated from a scarce number of speakers; historical photos show speakers on the central light poles down the middle of the land, and we can be sure there were a few others stashed here and there too. As always with early MK BGM, just because something was playing, doesn’t mean everyone heard it.

The earliest Tomorrowland BGM was preserved by Mike Cozart on a typed playlist from Jack Wagner’s estate; he kindly provided me with the list and the information that he had already located several of the tracks in the Capitol Media Music line. From there, collaborating with Michael Sweeney, I was able to find enough internet listings of the Capitol Media Music line to determine where the tracks came from and begin to hunt down the source material.

The resulting loop is very reminiscent of early EPCOT Center. Probably inspired by photos and concept at of Tomorrowland’s grand, magisterial architecture, Wagner turned to Media Music tracks intended to accompany scenes of nature, National Parks, and science. The music has a disarming, sweeping quality quite unlike the synth-pop we’re now accustomed to. This project marks the Premiere of the 1972 music.

The project begins with a brief snippet from the launch sequence from Mission to Mars. This attraction and its predecessor lacked any real formal music score, but by including a bit here it was possible to ensure that the show at least had some sort of representation in the project.

This first selection, which played in the “Concourse” section of Tomorrowland (think of those huge sloping walls), is “Majestic Scenery” by Henrik Nielsen, and the second is “Roots Revisited” by Jack Mayborn. The sound of the Tomorrowland entrance waterfalls is based on a pitch-corrected version of the Cosmic Ray’s waterfalls recorded in January 2014 overlaid with a waterfall recorded at Animal Kingdom in late 2011. There’s next to no audio record of what those falls sounded like going at full blast, so this is a best guess approximation.

WEDway Area Music – The next selection represents the next “era” of Tomorrowland’s musical backdrop, which began when the WEDway Peoplemover began operation in summer 1975. The WEDway track wound through all of Tomorrowland and the track had its own unique music loop, effectively drowning out whatever music happened to play on the ground level of Tomorrowland.

Originally, the WEDway played the same music loop as her cousin in Disneyland, a simple loop of the Disney-scored Monorail Song and World on the Move, repeated endlessly. In 1976, Wagner licensed additional tracks from Capitol Media Music, creating the delightfully jazz-lounge loops which are still remembered today.

Michael Sweeney and myself identified the WEDway loop pieces through process of elimination since no playlist existed. The first selection is “Outdoor Life #2”, by Henrik Nielsen, sourced from the original LP.

Grand Prix Raceway – sadly, no source music exists for the original Jack Wagner Grand Prix loop, which is in the Mike Cozart collection and which he refers to as sounding a lot like the “theme from CHiPS”. The track I use here is taken from the load area of Disneyland’s Peoplemover, which was sponsored by Goodyear, and is an instrumental arrangement of their corporate jingle at the time. Goodyear also sponsored MK’s Grand Prix, so this track is used to represent the Goodyear sponsorship as much as the attraction.

The Grand Prix noises underneath were recorded in 2011, 2012 and 2014.

Tomorrowland Terrace – much like Disneyland’s version, the restaurant which was re-themed into Cosmic Ray’s originally hosted a number of local and “resident” bands playing the “hits of today”. The original “Resident” group was Dallas Sound Track or DST, with frequent appearances by the Kids Next Door, a squeaky clean youth vocal group who Disney effectively bought out and re-named “The Kids of the Kingdom”. Sadly, there’s no real recorded performances by Dallas Sound Track and Kids of the Kingdom did cut a record in the late 60s, but the sound is totally inappropriate to the Tomorrowland atmosphere I wanted.

While looking through vintage WDW ephemera, I came across a Thanksgiving 1972 ad touting an appearance by “SAGE – Dancing to the “Now” Sound”. Most of my leads for these groups had been dead ends, but Sage turned out to be  a Tampa-based 60s-tinged garage rock group. Better yet, they had cut a record. Best of all, they were actually good!

The album is called “Sage by Sage” (I know), and it’s also been reissued on CD by Radioactive Records. It’s a terrific little indie record, and Sage provided exactly the keynote of atmosphere that I wanted – an era when Tomorrowland crazily juxtaposed smooth jazz, midcentury rock, and space fantasy to create a heady blend of youth and future unlike anything at Walt Disney World today.

Space Mountain presented by RCA – Rebuilding Space Mountain’s 1975 show accurately turned out to be one of this version’s major projects, perhaps unexpectedly. It wasn’t until I was receiving live recordings by Jerry Klatt and Mike Lee that I realized that the original soundscape was more complex than I thought, and that this was a challenge worth meeting.

The Jack Wagner safety spiel which kicks off the track originally played outside the attraction proper. It was added in 1976 after numerous guest injuries and remained there into the 1990s. This is a live recording provided by Mike Lee.

The entrance room of Space Mountain, where the floor slopes down into the railroad track tunnel, originally contained a unique ambient loop of tones – menacing “outer space” tones – which is almost a lost track. I became fascinated after hearing them in Jerry Klatt’s live recording (from 1975!) and tried to seek them out.

It turns out that this track is in common circulation – mixed into the background of another loop! It’s most commonly heard behind the “com chat” track, which plays in Florida’s boarding area. What seems to have happened is that for the Disneyland show in 1977, somebody decided to play the “com chat” in the attraction’s entrance area. Accompanying the com chat was the original “entrance tones”, placed at the entrance because, well, that’s where they were supposed to go. At some point it was forgotten that the two tracks were intended to be separate and somebody eventually replaced Florida’s unique load area mix with the Disneyland entrance mix.

I was able to separate the two tracks in Audacity and presented here is the sound of the original 1975 Space Mountain entrance area.

Underneath the train tracks, the first airing of Buddy Baker’s eccentric “RCA Leads the Way” theme was heard, alongside displays of RCA products. Baker’s 1975 Space Mountain music is very unique. It is of a piece with his other 70s compositions which experimented with “modern’ sound – America Sings and the Carousel of Progress – but is by far the least successful of this group. In the 70s, Space Mountain was a hornet’s nest of weird synth and guitar licks, and putting all that music in the proper order can yield interesting results.

Reconstructionists should be careful when building Space Mountain audio tracks, as two versions of the theme were recorded – one singing “RCA Leads the Way”, their corporate slogan at the time, and another with the refrain as “Let Your Dreams Lead the Way”, a forward-thinking admission on Disney’s part that they expected Space Mountain to far outlive its sponsorship agreement. The 1975 music dates much more badly than most Disney park music, and so when RCA renewed their sponsorship in 1985, all-new musical cues were commissioned. Some of these survive today, such as the classic “Star Tunnel” cue. (Hear my reconstruction of the 1983 score in the “Tomorrowland 1983” Bonus Track)

Thanks to Greg Maletic for sending along a higher-quality version of this first “RCA Leads the Way” track.

After the RCA tunnel, the Space Mountain queue slopes back upwards and zig-zags past a series of windows. Placing the appropriate keyboard-freakout synth in this area was made possible by recordings from 1983 made by Dave McCormick.

Originally, each window in the “zig zag corridor” had an accompanying narration, “explaining” the imagery seen outside each window. This is first-class scientific nonsense, and getting it back in the mix was made possible through a Mike Lee recording from 1990. There were originally five separate narration tracks, three male and two female. In Mike’s recording the second female narration was too low in volume to capture the whole thing, so a mere sample is represented here.

Once into the load area, the fourth distinct 1975 ambient piece, released on Walt Disney World Forever as “Warp”, can be heard in vintage recordings. This is also the proper location for our “Com Chat”, a track prefaced in the Zig Zag corridor by the last window announcement and also by the prominent placement of the ride’s control tower. The “Warp” track also played on the ride’s lift hill until 2009.

MK’s original “blue tunnel” sound effect sadly was retired before a clean copy of it could make it way online. The one heard here was recorded by Dave McCormick. The lift hill sounds were recorded by me in 2013, and the original safety announcement and “re-entry” sound effect comes from a track pack of Disneyland Space Mountain sounds that circulates amongst collectors.

The clanks and screams of the original on-ride experience comes from Martin’s Smith’s on-ride video from 2008.

The original RCA Home of Future Living exit song and music no longer exists in a quality copy. The best version is available on WaltsMusic.Com, in which the music and vocals are separated into left and right channels, allowing a reconstruction of the original 1975 loops. The version of “Here’s To the Future” without the pop vocals also played in the WEDway Peoplemover tunnel above the exit show.

The final track is “Neutral Strings in Motion #3” by Neil Amsterdam, from Capitol Media Music, representing more of the original WEDway loop. Thanks to Greg Maletic for suggesting the soundscape at the exit bleeding out to the sounds of the Speedway, a detail I had entirely forgotten since the ride has been enclosed by an arcade for twenty years now.

Tomorrow we’ll continue our walk through Tomorrowland with part 2 of this particular area. We’ll hear Michael Iceberg and his amazing Iceberg machine (anyone had the chance to see him live back then?), take a ride on the 1975 version of the General Electric Carousel of Progress, and more…

 
 
 
…it’s going to be a great time! This wonderful Tomorrowland track has been added to the Disney Avenue Music Player for you to listen to it whenever you’d like. See you right back here tomorrow where we’ll continue our tour of vintage Walt Disney World and part 2 of Tomorrowland!
 
 
 
 
 
 
*******

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

 
 
 

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A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World – Fantasyland

By Keith Mahne

We continue our Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World with a lovely walk through of vintage Fantasyland. We’ll hear the sounds of the Mickey Mouse Revue, the music that used to play around Cinderella Castle, take a ride on the Skyway and 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, and so much more! If you’re ready to travel back to old Fantasyland, here we go…

Part 9: Fantasyland

(If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7 and Part 8 of our musical journey of vintage Walt Disney World, please check them out before continuing. Also, be sure to pause the Disney Avenue Music Player in the top left-hand corner of this page if you are on a desktop computer.)

 

 
 
 
 
Here are Foxx’s notes on the creation of Track 9 – Fantasyland:
 
 
 

9) Fantasyland

The concept for the Fantasyland track is that it is the “Intermezzo” section of the project, and is characterized by many short, sharp bursts of music in rapid succession.

The Fantasyland track is prefaced with a brief section of the start of Mickey Mouse Revue, as the orchestra tunes up. The Mickey Mouse Revue is missing a proper segment in this track – although the music is quite charming and originally appeared after Peter Pan, it proved too redundant to have a medley of Disney music inside a track that was already a medley of Disney music. Still, it’s good to have some sot of representation of it in the collection. Every Magic Kingdom attraction has some sort of representation in the second version of the Musical Souvenir, no matter how small.

The “Fantasyland Overture” segment which follows is identical to a track recorded in 1956 for “People and Places: Disneyland USA” by Oliver Wallace, although it circulates in a collection of Buddy Baker cues and appears to have been recorded in the 1970s. The two versions are indistinguishable, so I used the 1956 recording which has a much richer sound thanks to its official restoration as part of the isolated soundtrack to “People and Places” on DVD.

Cinderella Castle – just like Sleeping Beauty Castle at Disneyland, Magic Kingdom’s castle originally played music, although it has since been turned very low. Since I had no strong memory of this music, I asked early WDW music expert Michael Sweeney, who directed me to find a “radio version” of A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes, from Cinderella, meaning that this version of the track would be music and vocal only, without sound effects. I ended up finding this on a 60s era Cinderella soundtrack record at a local record shop (DL-4007). Once I transferred this track, added ambience and echo, the sense of déjà vu was impossible to deny.

Confirmation, and a close approximation of WED’s original edit of the track, came from a YouTube video uploaded by user “John Greenstreet” from 1982, in which the Illene Wood vocal can be heard quite clearly.

King Stephan’s Banquet Hall – the Banquet Hall loop is part of the Mike Cozart collection, and is quite a unique accomplishment on Jack Wagner’s part. Consisting of medieval arrangements, including a few Disney songs, it’s another indicator of the beautiful and often strange choices made by WED in putting together the park. The door opening sound effect is from user “jkaas28” on Freesound.org, and the restaurant interior ambience comes from “John Sipos” on the same site. Long before the space was given over the princesses and parties, King Stephan’s was a beautiful, affordable restaurant draped in candlelit hushed elegance.

Skyway Chalet – Returning readers will recall that in 2012 I had not really any clue about the authentic Skyway sounds and presented some “Matterhorn Music” as a best guess. One of my big goals was to gain a clear picture of the “Swiss” music and how the various tracks fit into the history of the park.

While I can’t claim to have all of the answers, I do have more than I used to, and enough to present a far clearer outline than I had before.

There are exactly four authentic “Swiss” Wagner loops that still exist, all of differing vintages. The earliest is a 40 minute loop recorded by Mike Lee in 1991, which he recalls as being the earliest, original Pinocchio Village Haus loop. It’s quite leisurely and entirely instrumental, and the pace and length implies to me that it’s from 1971 or very close to it.

The next is the Matterhorn queue music from 1978, which uses music from the 1971 Haus loop as well as music which probably had played at the Matterhorn in Walt’s era, recorded by the Disneyland Yodeler Fred Burri.

The third item is a 60 minute loop of Swiss music created by Wagner for New Fantasyland and TDL in 1983. This loop is characterized by kicking off with a selection called “Snow White Medley”, performed by the Magic Kingdom’s Polka Band, released on the Jack Wagner produced “A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom”. It then combines material from the ’71 Village Haus loop as well as new material with a heavy emphasis on yodeling. This 1983 loop continues to play at Magic Kingdom and Disneyland today as the general “Fantasyland West” loop.

The fourth loop is a ten minute piece which is associated with the Skyway Chalet specifically. It’s merely tracks two through five of the 1983 loop. The “Snow White” medley does not begin the track, and it descends from the same vintage source as the early MK Main Street loops, the 1973 Frontierland loop, and more. I believe it is authentic, although truncated.

My guess is that Wagner at one point had different “Swiss” loops of entirely different character playing at Magic Kingdom – the instrumental arrangements in the Village Haus restaurant, and the yodeling and vocal tacks around the Skyway. The record that the “Skyway” vocal tracks come from – a vintage collection called “Bi Eus Im Schwyzerland, Vol 3” – is from the mid-70s, so there may not have been a distinct “Skyway” loop before then. In 1983, he combined material from both of the Magic Kingdom loops with new material top create the 60 minute loop for Disneyland and TDL, and that this 60 minute loop was later brought back over to Magic Kingdom in the early 90s and replaced the vintage loops.

As such, I’m fairly certain that using the tracks from “Bi Eus Im Schwyzerland, Vol. 3” is the most accurate representation of what was originally intended for this area. The clanks of the Skyway bucket exiting the station were recorded in 2014 at Busch Gardens Tampa, where a Skyway by the same manufacturer – Von Roll – is still operating. The Tampa skyway is a few years younger than our 1971 Skyway but the sounds are nearly identical.

It’s A Small World – Buddy Baker recorded a unique ten-minute loop of music for the Florida Small World’s covered loading area in 1971, consisting of one airing of the famous Sherman brothers’ theme alongside “International” standards like Mexican Hat Dance. Michael Sweeney provided this track, which he rebuilt from multiple released recordings.

Peter Pan’s Flight – This is sourced from the Tokyo Disneyland Treasures of Fantasy box set, as Tokyo features an exact clone of the 1971 ride – so exact, in fact, that their “Tinker Bell on a String” effect has never migrated out of the loading area and into the attraction like in Florida. Peter Pan’s Flight is a great example of a unique characteristic of the original Fantasyland tracks: they are all of extreme shortness.

Cinderella’s Golden Carrousel – this source track, from Treasures of Fantasy, is mixed with a number of live in-park recordings to provide the sound of the Village Haus glockenspiel (recorded in 2011) and the original Dumbo spinner ride. Tokyo Disneyland continued to use the 1971 carousel music tracks well into the 2000s.

I spent some time puzzling over the Carrousel bell, finally deciding it sounded most like a rotary telephone ring. I downloaded the sound off YouTube, pitch corrected it to match a 2014 live recording, and dropped it into the track.

Snow Whites Adventures – the original Snow White load area used a brief (less than a minute!) recording of “I’m Wishing”, which was actually recorded for the Mickey Mouse Revue across the street. In the park, there was a long gap of silence following the end of the song, about ten seconds, before it began again. I have omitted the gap in this version. The characteristic “Step out to your left please” announcement migrated to Magic Kingdom’s Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh in 1998, where I recorded it using an induction microphone in 2014.

Walt Disney World Band Afternoon Concert is a brief medley also from their self-titled LP. This represents the original Fantasy Faire bandstand next to the Village Haus, which made way for the first Ariel’s Grotto in 1996. From 1971 until the 90s it hosted character shows, concerts, and the other of Magic Kingdom’s original “rising floor” stages.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea – this segment is based on a 15 minute version of the queue music in general circulation. This music was probably recorded by WED in 1971 as use for queue BGM, and it was later re-used in both the Columbia Harbour House and the Cape Cod area of Tokyo DisneySea. The music was made available on WDW Forever and an excellent quality reconstruction of the queue loop is thus possible. The version I used here is a slightly muddier version in general circulation which includes the Captain Nemo narration, memorably voiced by Pete Renoudet.

The waterfalls in the distance are two waterfalls found at Animal Kingdom recorded in 2012, mixed together and then pitched to correspond closely to those heard in a reference video provided by Mike Lee. The distinctive underwater whirr of the submarines themselves was sourced directly from this same video.

The original Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride area loop was a recorded by Mike Lee and pitch-corrected by Chris Lyndon. Like many other early Magic Kingdom tracks recorded in 1970 and 1971, this distinctive version had a lot of reverb and echo processed into the track, resulting in a tinny sound that’s unfortunately native to the recording. This original music track was replaced by the Disneyland Mr. Toad choral track during a 1993 refurbishment.

The Mad Tea Party – the music which played in this area from 1971 to 1991 was taken from Disneyland Records release WDL-4015, “Alice in Wonderland: Music from the Score by Camarata Chorus and Orchestra”, as identified by Michael Sweeney.

Although this loop is generally fully accepted as original, I have yet to definitely identify any overhead or area speakers in photographs of the original, roofless version of the attraction. As the speakers which played this music are built into the roof over the ride platform, it was definitely in place by 1972 or 1973 at the latest and removed in 1991. I’ve also heard this loop in use in the early 80s at Disneyland’s uncovered version of the Tea Party. The “squeaky brake” which is characteristic of the Florida ride only was recorded live in 2013.

 
 
 
It’s just going to get better and better from here folks! Tomorrow we’ll head over to Tomorrowland for a two part series of this beloved area! We’ll hear things like Michael Iceberg and his Iceberg Machine, the original WEDway Peoplemover, the entrance room of Space Mountain, and many more…
 
 
 


…hang on tight as this journey through Walt Disney World’s history is far from over. This wonderful Fantasyland track has been added to the Disney Avenue Music Player for you to listen to it whenever you’d like. See you right back here tomorrow where we’ll continue our tour of vintage Walt Disney World for a walk through the original Tomorrowland…

 
******

 

 
 
 
 


Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

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A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World – Frontierland

By Keith Mahne

Welcome back to our Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World adventure! Today we’ll continue our tour of Disney World’s past with a walk through 1970s Frontierland. I particularly enjoy this track and think you will as well. We have a lot more music to cover so let’s not waste any more time. Enjoy your journey through Frontierland of yesteryear…

Part 8: Frontierland

(If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6 and Part 7 of our musical journey of vintage Walt Disney World, please check them out before continuing. Also, be sure to pause the Disney Avenue Music Player in the top left-hand corner of this page if you are on a desktop computer.)



Here are Foxx’s notes on the creation of Track 8 – Frontierland:

8) Frontierland

Of all the tracks in the first version of the Musical Souvenir, to me the Frontierland track was by far the greatest incentive to rework the project. Based largely on a 1973 Frontierland BGM loop I didn’t like and featuring live acts I couldn’t stand, the first version of Frontierland was mercifully brief and totally lacking in “Frontierland” atmosphere. I was determined to fix this.

The basic problem with the ’73 Wagner loop is that it was a mash-up of folk and honky-tonk piano tunes which were neither especially atmospheric nor especially Westerny. What probably sounded good in his studio simply tanked when it came to playing in the park. What was needed wasn’t authentic West, but Hollywood West. Wagner fixed this problem when he licensed a stack of tracks from the Capitol Media Music production library in the mid-70s.

A new music loop, comprising these tracks plus older material from the ’73 version, debuted in 1976. Fortunately by the time it came for me to attempt another version of the Musical Souvenir, Michael Sweeney had tentatively identified a number of these Media Music tracks in home videos from the 1980s. No live recording of the full ’76 loop has yet been found, so the entire contents of this loop remain mysterious. A WDI-created loop, shared with Westernland in Tokyo Disneyland, debuted in 1991 and plays there to this day.

The opening track is “Country & Western #2”, composed by Henrik Nielsen. I think most will agree that this track sets a much more appropriate Western stage than the bluegrass which previously opened this track.

“Strawberry Hill” – performed by Nelson Young and the Sandy Bottom Boys, a Florida-based bluegrass act which performed in Frontierland six days a week throughout the 1970s. The quality of this bluegrass is much higher than that offered by the “Bluegrass Boys” of the previous version. A fixture of Florida Folk Festivals, this recording was uploaded to YouTube by user “Stephen Estes”. The background ambience, of the original Frontierland Shootin’ Arcade, was recorded by Jerry Klatt in the early 80s and sourced from Mike Lee’s Widen Your World.

Up next is a medley of Frontierland songs, starting with Henrik Nielsen’s “Country & Western #5”. The next track, “Buffalo Gals”, was recorded by fiddler Tommy Jackson for his LP “Square Dance Festival”. This track was located by Michael Sweeney, who noticed another Jackson song in the 1982 EPCOT Center loop for The Land’s Framer’s Market. Farmer’s Market also shared some early Frontierland tracks, and subsequently Michael was able to identify “Buffalo Gals” playing live in a 1980’s home video. Cuts from Jackson’s record also underscore Frontierland in the 1990 souvenir video in “A Day at the Magic Kingdom”.

Dan Kirsten’s “Evening Campfire” is next, and this song is more commonly known as the “Mighty Dog” song. In the 1970s, dogfood producer Mighty Dog licensed this track from Capitol Media Music for a memorable series of national campaigns, and so of course most children would have recognized the same song playing in Frontierland and remembered the abnormality. “Evening Campfire” was released through Capitol Media Music’s “Hi-8” series and appears here courtesy of Michael Sweeney.

“Pianjo”, performed by Don Robertson, appears here in it’s full version, sourced from my 45 copy of the song. Henry’s comments at the start and end of the song, as well as the fuller version of “Come Again”, are taken from “A Musical History of Disneyland”, which crucially includes the entire exit track; the 1972 LP fades out in the middle of the track.

Representing both the Mile Long Bar and Frontierland generally is “Bearless Love”, recorded by the Stoneman Family under the supervision of George Bruns. The track appears on the reverse side of the 1972 “Country Bear Jamboree” LP release. The Jack Wagner Frontierland station announcement is a live recording, made by Dave McCormick in 1983.

Near the end of the track a bit of dialogue from the Davy Crockett Explorer Canoes can be heard; this is sourced from a 2011 live recording of the attraction available on YouTube as “Disneyland Canoe Ride” uploaded by user classichristine69, one of the few live recordings of the attraction without music dubbed over it.

The final bit of the track, the “Beacon Joe Music”, is one of the most hauntingly simple pieces of music to play in the entire park. Replacing the previous live recording by Mike Lee, this is an induction recording made by me in 2014. For many years the “Beacon Joe” track also played on the raft landing in Frontierland, but by the 1990s was gone. It appeared unexpectedly in early October 2014, allowed me to capture a source-quality copy. It ends Frontierland on an unexpectedly spare, poignant note.

 
 
 
I just love that track, especially the part after you hear, “Give me a little intro there Gomer…”. Tomorrow we move onward with a REALLY magical track of vintage Fantasyland…
 
 
 
 
 
 
…I can hardly wait! This wonderful Frontierland track has been added to the Disney Avenue Music Player for you to listen to it whenever you’d like. See you right back here tomorrow where we’ll continue our tour of vintage Walt Disney World for a walk through the original Fantasyland…
 
 
 
 
 ******
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

 
 
 

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A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World – Mike Fink Keel Boats

By Keith Mahne

Are you ready to take a seat on the Gullywhumper, the legendary keel boat of Mike Fink, King of the River? If you’re partial to Davy Crockett, you might prefer a seat on the Bertha Mae, the legendary keel boat of the King of the Wild Frontier. Either way, the Mike Fink Keel Boats are just a distant memory of WDW’s past. Thanks to our Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World tour, we’ll get to revisit the keel boats for one last ride! What do you say, ready to go? Remember, don’t stand up or this keel boat might keel over and we’ll all be keeled…

Part 7: Mike Fink Keel Boats

(If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, and Part 6 of our musical journey of vintage Walt Disney World, please check them out before continuing. Also, be sure to pause the Disney Avenue Music Player in the top left-hand corner of this page if you are on a desktop computer.)

Here are Foxx’s notes on the creation of Track 7 – Mike Fink Keel Boats:

7) Mike Fink Keel Boats

Since the Jungle Cruise ended up being represented in this track collection primarily by sound effects, I decided that the other great original Magic Kingdom spiel attraction, the Mike Fink Keelboats, should have a fuller representation of a spiel. The initial plan was to reconstruct the entire ride, but I was deterred from this goal by the excellent fan compilation “WDW40”, which did the same thing about as well as I expected I could.

Instead, I used the Keelboats to transition from Liberty Square to Frontierland, with a stronger emphasis on the Keelboat Dock’s atmosphere. The music here is a collection of six tracks running about 18 minutes associated with the Keelboat attraction and dated 1973 – the music is unidentified and its use in-park is unconfirmed. Still, the music is very evocative and probably comes to us through the same collector’s circuit as the other early music loops.

At one point, a bugle call can be heard. This effect emanates from the fort on Tom Sawyer Island and the actual sound effect I used here is inauthentic. The source cues WED used for the 1973 Tom Sawyer Island are unavailable, in this case I substituted an identical bugle call downloaded from the internet. The timing of the calls was important to me, and the authentic spacing and order heard in Version 2 of this collection is thanks to Andrew Bates, who recorded a live reference track on Tom Sawyer Island in October 2012 to help in this recreation.

D23’s Michael Crawford, of Progress City USA, provided the on-board narration, based off a script I compiled from old park documents, home videos, and Keelboater recollections. The sound of the Keelboat engine is a pitch-corrected version of the Jungle Cruise engine noise I mixed, using a recording by Mike Lee as reference.

New to this revised track is a brief pass-by of the Diamond Horseshoe show in progress. This comes from a 1986 home video uploaded to YouTube by user “Seanb”.

The bird chips heard in this track and the next are actual vintage in-park sound effects recorded by WED and played on Tom Sawyer Island and around the fort. They were released on the “Treasures of Fantasy” Tokyo Disneyland box set.

 
 
 
Ya’ll didn’t get wet now did ya?!? I swear, I close my eyes while listening and it honestly feels like I’m on a keel boat on the Rivers of America! I can’t thank Foxx Nolte enough for this wonderful creation! Let’s keep this momentum going; tomorrow we’ll hear the sounds of Frontierland circa 1973. Although I cherish each of these tracks dearly, this next Frontierland loop we’ll hear tomorrow is one of my favorites!
 
 
 
 
 
The Mike Fink Keel Boats track has been added to the Disney Avenue Music Player for you to listen to it whenever you’d like. See you right back here tomorrow where we’ll continue our tour of vintage Walt Disney World for a walk through old Frontierland…
 
 
 
 
 
 ******
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World – Liberty Square

By Keith Mahne

It’s time to continue our Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World journey and take a visit to Liberty Square circa 1973. On this part of our tour back in time, we’ll hear vintage sounds of the Haunted Mansion, the Columbia Harbour House track, a ceremony at the Liberty Tree, and so much more. Let’s not waste another minute…step aboard the time machine and let’s take a walk around 1970s Liberty Square…

Part 6: Liberty Square

(If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5 of our musical journey of vintage Walt Disney World, please check them out before continuing. Also, be sure to pause the Disney Avenue Music Player in the top left-hand corner of this page if you are on a desktop computer.)

Here are Foxx’s notes on the creation of Track 6 – Liberty Square:

6) Liberty Square

The introductory flourishes are Buddy Baker incidental music recorded for “The Magic of WDW” in 1972.

Bridge Area Music: “Rally ‘Round the Flag / Battle Cry of Freedom” – Eastman Wind Ensemble – this short piece is from a 15 minute loop associated with Liberty Square and dated 1971. It’s from Mike Cozart’s collection and has long fades at the start and end of many tracks, as well as long gaps between tracks. I think what Wagner was attempting to do here was to give the impression of a march fife and drum group off in the distance. We have no real evidence of where or how long this played in the park, or where it was audible from.

This has been mixed with a meadow ambience track sourced from [FS]: “Outdoor Ambience” recoded by user RHumpries. The Riverboat whistles and bells were recorded by me in 2011 and 2012.

Americana Themes – this unique edited track, consisting of excerpts from Baker’s scores for The Hall of Presidents, Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln and the Circlevision film “America the Beautiful” takes the place of a Hall of Presidents track in this collection. Baker drew on the same themes for these three attractions, sourced from American folk music, original pastiche and his 1957 soundtrack for the Disney production “Johnny Tremain”, and all of these scores are in fact quite similar.

There is no available music-only source for the original Hall of Presidents show “One Nation Under God”. My primary two options – outside exclusion – were to edit the commonly-circulated LP album, which would violate my dictum of not including too many vocal tracks in my project. My other option was to default to the far inferior 1993 Baker score for the attraction, which is available in excellent quality but which would be violating my intended represented time period. After attempting to edit the Great Moments score to correspond to parts of the very similar Hall of Presidents score, I decided a smooth edit of all the possible Baker “Americana” material would better represent the flavor of the original attraction without compromising the guidelines of my project.

The Hall of Presidents pieces were excerpted from the 1972 titular LP release by Disneyland Records. The Great Moments score came from the Walt Disney records collection “Walt Disney and the 1964 World’s Fair”. And the America the Beautiful score came from “A Musical History of Disneyland”, also by Walt Disney Records. Since this does not represent an accurate musical reconstruction of the “One Nation Under God” show, I have decided not to identify it as Hall of Presidents music in my track list. I think this is the best solution given the current limitations of my resources.

The two entertainment tracks – The Banjo Kings and The Ancients – can be found on “A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom”. The vocal segments which represent the Ancients’ ceremony at the Liberty Tree may be found in the “The Magic of WDW” 1972 film.

New to version 2 is the sound of a Wurlitzer CX Orchestrion playing on the Riverboat landing. Due to my earlier research on the Main Street Penny Arcade, I knew that an orchestrion had been present on the landing, but had not seriously considered why until looking at old photos of Disneyland on Daveland.com. There, I found photos of an identical Orchestrion at the Disneyland Mark Twain landing, which had provided the ambient music around the attraction. This Orchestrion supposedly broke in the late 70s, at which point a tape of it was made which played in the waiting area and was recently (in 2012) rediscovered and restored by Imagineering.

A photo of the MK Riverboat Landing in Valerie Childs’ “The Magic of Disneyland and Walt Disney World” proves that Magic Kingdom had, at least at first, continued this Walt-era tradition, so a suitable Orchestrion tune was found in “Shine On, Harvest Moon”, again courtesy of Robert’s Musical Restorations in Deland.

The Haunted Mansion – I approached this segment of the track with trepidation: after all, how many Haunted Mansion sound mixes can there be in the world? This is a very full cottage industry, but by sticking close to my overall intentions for this project, it became clear that I should focus instead on unusual or lost “characteristic soundscapes” from the attraction.

After a brief introductory segment I included the requisite “new-to-Florida” Music Room piece, as the way that particular piece of music used to echo all the way up the subsequent Grand Staircase scene was one of the attraction’s most distinctive aural features; although a wall now divides the two scenes, it’s noteworthy that WDI bothered to pitch-process the Music Room piano track to sound echoed and distant and play it in the new Endless Staircase scene, artificially replicating this effect. Also included is the Creaking Floorboards effect, which plays on in Anaheim and Tokyo but which went missing from Orlando in the mid-90s and never returned.

At the “top” of the staircase, I wanted to replicate the sound that the spider figures used to make, a distinctive, almost subconscious “click-click”. This sound was created by a solenoid valve hidden near the floor. Stretching between the valve and the rubber spider figure itself was a string, and the spider seemed to “twitch” as the valve opened and closed. After a great deal of trial and error, I was able to replicate the sound using a normal household “S” clip. I “performed” the clicks myself.

The voices which once dominated the Corridor of Doors were removed in 2007, as was the distinctive X Atencio breakdown spiel, two soundscapes I was anxious to replicate: it simply wasn’t a trip through the Mansion unless one heard X echoing very dimly from some far off speaker.

By localizing the breakdown in the Corridor of Doors scene, this also allowed me to recreate another characteristic of a Haunted Mansion show stop: clacking from the moving doorknockers, which can be hard through practically the entire attraction while the audio is muted. The door knocker in the attraction is a practical sound created by the physical impact between two props; the effect is run from a rotary motor mounted behind the door attached to a rotating wooden disk. As the disk turns, a peg makes contact with grooves cut in the side of the disc, either being pushed out by the edge of the disc or falling into a deep groove, creating the “clack” noise heard while onride.

Obviously capturing the authentic sound is almost impossible. After experimenting with a number of household substitutes such as spoons and a board, I decided the best option would be to record an actual doorknocker mounted on a door and use that sound. Almost none of the doorknockers found at hardware stores sounded right, and after a while I even tried a recording of the actual prop using a microphone taped to the end of a long stick. However, after 40+ years of use, the actual knock mechanism has been turned way down, and the sound was unacceptable.

Finally, I found the proper sound in an unlikely source: a YouTube video of Tony Baxter doing an after-hours walking tour of the Florida Mansion. This sound was loud, as loud as I remembered it.

The sounds heard approaching the Attic scene from the Ballroom seemed to be a consensus tactile memory of the attraction, and reproducing this proved to be quite simple. For version 2, I was able to restore two extra Attic screams that had been excluded from the earlier track.

Version 1 of the track caused some confusion in my decision to include a stock Haunted Mansion laugh in the exit corridor. Disneyland has had this laugh since the start and I’ve seen early sound plans which indicated it was intended to go in the Florida version as well, but this proved to be a miscalculation and confused nearly everyone. It’s removed in version 2. The final “sense memory” fell into place accidentally: the sound of the Richard F. Irvine from the exit area of the attraction.

The Columbia Harbour House track is sourced from WDW Forever. General consensus was that “My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean” evoked memories of the restaurant far stronger than any of the other tracks. The music is probably original and still plays there today.

This magical music really has the power to transport you back to Walt Disney World’s early years. Just as it was created to do, one can really close their eyes and feel as if you are there. I hope you’ve been enjoying our musical tour of Walt Disney World’s past! Tomorrow we’ll resume our Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World  with the sounds of the long gone Mike Fink Keel Boats…
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
…I can hardly wait! The Liberty Square track is now part of the Disney Avenue Music Player; enjoy it whenever you’re in the mood! I’ll see you right back here tomorrow as we continue this Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World and board a Mike Fink Keel Boat…see you then!
 
 
 
 
 
 
*****
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

 
You can find all of Keith’s articles here.
 
 
 


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A Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World – Caribbean Plaza

By Keith Mahne

Welcome back to our Musical Souvenir of Walt Disney World experience through Disney World’s good ol’ days! Today, we’ll experience Caribbean Plaza and the sounds of pirates, the tropics, the original Pirates of the Caribbean attraction boarding area, and so much more! If you’re all set and ready to roll, keep your hands and feet in this WDW time machine and let’s get the show on the road…

Part 5: Caribbean Plaza

(If you haven’t had a chance to listen to Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4 of our musical journey of vintage Walt Disney World, please check them out before continuing. Also, be sure to pause the Disney Avenue Music Player in the top left-hand corner of this page if you are on a desktop computer.)

Here are Foxx’s notes on the creation of Track 5 – Caribbean Plaza:

5) Caribbean Plaza

Caribbean Plaza is one of the tracks in this set which wasn’t simply lengthened or improved, but entirely rebuilt. This wasn’t the original intention, but as one segment after another continued to be replaced, the result is one of the most fully realized tracks in the collection from the perspective of adherence to my original vision for this project.

“Adventureland Delight” – Junior Pouchet – J.P. and the Silver Stars, the iconic steel drum band whom played in the central Traders of Timbuktu plaza, Caribbean Plaza, and in the daily parade, were Adventureland mainstays for decades. This track, one of Pouchet’s best original compositions, has been shortened considerably from its original length for pacing reasons.

Caribbean Plaza Area Music: “Erica” – Westland Steel Band – the original 1973 Caribbean Plaza area music was unusual for its time in that it was simply the first nine (of eleven) tracks on the 1967 album “Trinidad: The Sound of the Sun”, presented in the same order as on the LP. This was discovered by Michael Sweeney, who based his play list on a 1989 live recording by Mike Lee. The album has been remastered and is available from Nonesuch Records. For version 2, I chose the slightly slower and more distinctive “Erica”, replacing “Coc-che-ohco”, to create a more distinctive separation between the Pouchet track and the proper area BGM selection.

To create the feeling of the tropics I have included a number of ambient effects. The sound of the fountains is sourced from Freesound.org, a recording by user Dobroide called “Villa Maria Trickle”. The sound of the firing cannons along the roof of the show building is mixed from the stock Disney Pirates of the Caribbean cannon sound from the “Pirates of the Caribbean 33th Anniversary” CD, processed to closely match a number of reference home videos of the sound in situ. The distinctive pneumatic “hiss” of the cannons was recreated by me with an ordinary household canister of compressed air. “Pirates 33” also served as the source for all the other Pirates music tracks except where noted.

The “Barker Parrot” dialogue is sourced from a reel-to-reel tape, graciously provided by “Strange & Frightening Sounds”. This same reel also provided the “Soldiers of the Castillo” and “Digging Pirates” sound effects, in much higher aural quality than was previously available.

Into the Castillo – until 2006, the piece of music which played just inside the turnstiles was what is officially known as the “Pirates Arcade” music, and snippets of it accompany Fortune Red at Disneyland. Past the turnstile area, a number of “diagetic” music pieces played, including the “Soldiers of the Castillo” and “Spanish Guitar” tracks heard here. The source for these Florida-specific tracks has never been made available, but the “Spanish Guitar” recording was made live by myself as a Cast Member working the attraction in 2005. I believe it is the finest available recording.

“Pirate’s Cove”, the attraction’s boarding area, has a background loop of crashing waves and squawking seagulls. Attempts to obtain this simple loop via induction recording were unacceptable, so the version heard here is a combination of two sound effects loops obtained from Freesound.org: “Flock of seagulls” by jskiddink and “Waves, big. 3m distance” by Leandros.Ntounis.

The “Treasury Scene” is a reconstruction of the same scene using tracks 17 and 5 from “Pirates 33”, using a live video of the attraction in early 2006 as reference material. I mixed this scene just as WED did in 1973, from a new “Parrot’s Life For Me” vocal track and excerpts of the deleted “Arsenal Scene” vocal tracks at Disneyland. Pirates in Florida was an economically engineered attraction.

The singing parrot, by the way, originally re-appeared in the Unload area to warn guests as they stepped into the speed ramp, and this and the “Parrot’s Life” song are two of just a handful of tracks recoded specifically for the 1973 version; notice that neither of the 1973 parrot voices match the original talking parrot vocal track in the Burning City. This second Unload parrot was then shortly moved outside, possibly due to traffic congestion, and given a third vocal track which does not match either of the previously recorded two. He appeared outside the attraction to inform guests what could be found inside until 2006.

I considered including the talking parrot Unload spiel in addition to the “barker” track I’d already included – the Unload spiel can be heard on “Pirates 33” – but decided against it since very few ever saw or heard this original arrangement and the two were never installed at the same time. Although dates are hard to pin down, this music set is mostly located in the late 1970’s and it’s generally accepted that the Unload parrot was moved outside after a very brief stint downstairs.

The track ends with the George Bruns’ “Pirates Overture”, just as the attraction has ended since opening day. Providing the appropriate grace note is a recording of the attraction’s characteristically squeaky upramp, recorded during an attraction breakdown in September 2013.

 
 
 
Caribbean Plaza is a must do for any of our WDW vacations and it was so nice to reminisce back to it’s youth! Ahhh what wonderful memories! We still have 9 more tracks to cover with the next being Liberty Square! Tomorrow we’ll hear vintage sounds of the Haunted Mansion, the Columbia Harbour House track, a ceremony at the Liberty Tree, and so much more…
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Caribbean Plaza track is now part of the Disney Avenue Music Player so feel free to enjoy it whenever you please! See you right back here tomorrow as we take a stroll through vintage Liberty Square…
 
 
 
 
 
 
******

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Keith Michael Mahne is the owner and editor of Disney Avenue and the host of the Disney Avenue Podcast. He has made countless trips to the Walt Disney World resort since his first trip in 1989 at the age of four.

Keith has a strong passion and respect for Walt Disney, the parks and resorts, and the men and women who help create them. He started Disney Avenue as a way to inform and entertain readers and to repay all those who make dreams come true every day.

 
 
 

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